Benoît Delbecq: Nu-Turn

©Laurence Svirchev

On this CD French pianist/composer Benoît Delbecq sits at a Steinway D-Model and improvises. The piano is played both in its natural state and “prepared” by placing carved twigs of different wood species and other materials under the strings. The recording techniques are advanced and the final outcome is . . . → Read More: Benoît Delbecq: Nu-Turn

The Schlippenbach Trio: Jazz em Agosto, Lisbon 2005

Words & Photography ©Laurence Svirchev

In his 2005 book Some Hustling This!, Mark Miller quotes a critic writing in 1916 about a performance of the Creole Jazz Band held in Victoria. BC, Canada: “Nobody but six negro eccentric players could shatter so many rules of a well-integrated band and make it . . . → Read More: The Schlippenbach Trio: Jazz em Agosto, Lisbon 2005

Benoît Delbecq: A Paris Recording Session January 16, 2000 Paris, France

Words and Photography ©Laurence Svirchev

On a Monday morning François Houle, Michael Moore, and I met in the lobby of the Hôtel Compostelle. We crossed the rue du roi du Sicilie . . . → Read More: Benoît Delbecq: A Paris Recording Session January 16, 2000 Paris, France

“If You Start from Point-Zero, You have to Imagine Something” An interview with Alexander von Schlippenbach

©Laurence Svirchev

LS: You’ve been playing this music a long time. Would you tell the JazzPhoto audience how your music has changed. Perhaps you can start from the beginning of your career.

Schlippenbach: I started to get in touch with jazz at the age of 11 or 12 at . . . → Read More: “If You Start from Point-Zero, You have to Imagine Something” An interview with Alexander von Schlippenbach

Globe Unity Orchestra: Jazz em Agosto, Lisbon 2005

Words & Photography ©Laurence Svirchev. First publication 2005

Founded by Alexander von Schlippenbach in 1966, Globe Unity has one of the more intriguing approaches to improvising. Making a coherent musical statement with eleven improvising musicians is a formidable undertaking yet Globe Unity’s tackles the task with aplomb.

Globe Unity Schlippenbach . . . → Read More: Globe Unity Orchestra: Jazz em Agosto, Lisbon 2005

40th Anniversary Concert of the Globe Unity Orchestra

Editor’s Note: The following essays from 2011 string together the complete review of the Globe Unity Orchestra’s 40th Anniversary Concert at the Berlin Jazz Festival. The first essay was jointly published with Signal to Noise magazine. The second essay provides a brief hisotry of the Globe Unity Orchestra. The third traces the hisotry . . . → Read More: 40th Anniversary Concert of the Globe Unity Orchestra

Globe Unity And The Little Red Hen

by: George E. Lewis

If you want to see a telling face of the Globe Unity Orchestra, watch the opening moments of Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck’s 2006 film, Das Leben der Anderen, about the dislocations of community under the Stasi-surveilled Deutsche Demokratische Republik (GDR). Notice the portrayal of . . . → Read More: Globe Unity And The Little Red Hen

Dave Brubeck Quartet at Carnegie Hall

The Dave Brubeck Quartet was among the most popular, tightest-sounding, long-lasting, and lucrative combos in jazz history. Brubeck, academically trained under Darius Milhaud, was outspoken about the use of improvisation, polytonality, and polyrhythm in jazz. Brubeck and Paul Desmond frequently composed in 5/4, 9/8, 11/4, not your average time signatures in the 1950’s . . . → Read More: Dave Brubeck Quartet at Carnegie Hall

Thelonious Sphere Monk: Monk Alone & Live at the It Club

Monk Alone: The Complete Columbia Solo Studio Recordings 1962-1968, Columbia/Legacy (C2K65495); Live at the It Club Complete Columbia/Legacy (C2K65288)

©Laurence Svirchev

Thelonious Sphere Monk was his given name at birth. He had a nickname that was used pejoratively in the press of the time: Melodious . . . → Read More: Thelonious Sphere Monk: Monk Alone & Live at the It Club

The Peaceful Side of Billy Strayhorn

Capitol Jazz

©Laurence Svirchev

This long-unavailable 1961 recording was the product of a serendipitous meeting between Strayhorn and producer Alan Douglas in a Parisian night-club where “Strays” hung out. As Duke Ellington’s right-hand man, Strayhorn composed and arranged many of Ellington’s best-known tunes. He recorded infrequently on his own. Douglas’ intention was to . . . → Read More: The Peaceful Side of Billy Strayhorn