Tampere Jazz Happening, Finland: November 2-4, 2001

Tampere, Finland is located on about the same latitude as Whitehorse in the Yukon. A three hour train ride north of the capital of Helsinki, it is the last city one leaves before venturing into Finland’s true north. In November the climate is a transition into the sunless winter and is not the . . . → Read More: Tampere Jazz Happening, Finland: November 2-4, 2001

Tampere Jazz Happening October 30-November 1, 1998

©Laurence Svirchev

Certain music festivals stamp their audacious mark by programming the most adventurously valid music available. These festivals tend to be located in places that are well-known only to local residents or the afficionados who make it their business to find niches housing the most sublime musical satisfactions. Such festivals . . . → Read More: Tampere Jazz Happening October 30-November 1, 1998

Lisle Ellis: Ninja Of The Bass

Interview & Photography ©Laurence Svirchev

You never know what darkened comer Lisle Ellis music will strike from, what chops he will use to resonate never-before heard sounds from string and wood, or what instrumentation/choreography he will incorporate into a work. Lisle Ellis is a musical surprise attack, the ninja of the . . . → Read More: Lisle Ellis: Ninja Of The Bass

François Houle and Marilyn Crispell: Any Terrain Tumultuous

©Laurence M Svirchev

Some landscapes are so terrifyingly beautiful and forbiddingly austere that only the most masterful musicians dare navigate them and return home triumphantly. On Any Terrain Tumultuou, François Houle (clarinet) and Marilyn Crispell (piano) explore such vistas with a complex interplay between written and improvisational sections, periods of quietude released from dynamic harmonic . . . → Read More: François Houle and Marilyn Crispell: Any Terrain Tumultuous

George Graewe, Marcio Mattos, Minchael Vatcher: Impressions of Monk

©Laurence Svirchev

There are only two ways to play the music of Thelonious Sphere Monk: the wrong way and the right way. Wrong-way musicians are generally from the Repertory School of jazz. They homogenize the music, blend the cream with the lean, and devoid it of its unique flavors and textural layers. But Monk’s compositions . . . → Read More: George Graewe, Marcio Mattos, Minchael Vatcher: Impressions of Monk

Gerry Hemingway -An Appetite for the Unimaginable: Transportive Experiences through a Perfect World

Words and Photography ©Laurence Svirchev

Gerry Hemingway has this smooth reserved body language. Sharply focused intelligence becomes obvious when one is close enough to observe his bright, penetrating eyes. When interested in a topic, he tilts his head inquisitively. His speech tones are of lower timbre and the velocity of words . . . → Read More: Gerry Hemingway -An Appetite for the Unimaginable: Transportive Experiences through a Perfect World

Robert Dick & Ursel Schlicht: Photosphere

Words and Photography ©Laurence Svirchev

Lapis lazuli is a gem stone whose intensity entrances the eye and seduces the mind into a state of heightened awareness. The intensity of the blue’s specular reflections transmits powerful forces, potent stuff eligible for assimilation by an attentive soul. The diffuse reflections from the golden . . . → Read More: Robert Dick & Ursel Schlicht: Photosphere

Mark Dresser Solo Bass: Unveil

©Laurence Svirchev

Virtuosity in the jazz world is a given. Jazz players are what they are because they have mastered virtuosic technique and don’t want to live under the rigidly-exacting thumb of a concert task-master. They take their creative fancy elsewhere and go farther to that highest of art forms, improvisation.

. . . → Read More: Mark Dresser Solo Bass: Unveil

Miles Davis and Gil Evans: Complete Columbia Studio Recordings

©Laurence Svirchev

Now approaching their fifth decennial, the principle studio collaborations of . . . → Read More: Miles Davis and Gil Evans: Complete Columbia Studio Recordings

Kartet – The Bay Window

©Laurence Svirchev

A host of individuals in the history of jazz have had a unique, instantly identifiable sound. Think of Louis Armstrong, Earl Hines, Coleman Hawkins, Johnny Hodges, Cecil Taylor, or Paul Desmond, and just as easily think of many more. But here’s a difference between an individual having a sound, . . . → Read More: Kartet – The Bay Window